Discussion:
Civil Engineering vs Electrical Engineering?
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m***@privacy.net
2009-03-08 17:54:40 UTC
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Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue

EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon

Advice? Opinions?
r***@ivnet.com
2009-03-08 18:12:52 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
My dad might be a good one to ask, since he has a CE degree and was
about 1 credit hour short of having an EE degree when he graduated.
He wound up going into the CE field, but was involved with a lot of
utility work including electrical power transmission. He also was
offered a job in the oil industry in Venezuela, which he passed up
even though they had the highest $ offer.

He would tell you to assess your interests and follow your heart.
Either field has ample opportunities, and both pay above average for
an entire career path, compared to all fields of college graduates.
If you are an outdoors-type person, there are more opportunities in CE
for construction-related field work, although (again) my dad could've
been a field engineer for power line construction with an EE degree as
well as a CE. EE's are typically more office-oriented, though. Both
fields are highly computerized these days, but there's probably more
hands-on computer work with EE. Both fields are CADD-intensive for
many applications. If you are good at digital and microprocessor
design, your talents will probably always be in demand in the EE
field. Same if your interests are in structure design in the CE
field.

RP
m***@privacy.net
2009-03-08 20:24:34 UTC
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Post by r***@ivnet.com
My dad might be a good one to ask, since he has a CE degree and was
about 1 credit hour short of having an EE degree when he graduated.
Well is there enough overlap between CE and EE that it
is possible to get BOTH at same time with little extra
coursework?
r***@ivnet.com
2009-03-08 20:57:15 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Post by r***@ivnet.com
My dad might be a good one to ask, since he has a CE degree and was
about 1 credit hour short of having an EE degree when he graduated.
Well is there enough overlap between CE and EE that it
is possible to get BOTH at same time with little extra
coursework?
I wouldn't say "little extra".

In my dad's case, his college years were interrupted by a stint in the
US Navy, where he took most of his EE coursework. His college credits
totalled about 165 semester hours when he graduated, including his
military course credits. He would have needed about 125-130 semester
hours to graduate with a single degree.

I would say to get a double CE/EE degree, he'd need a minimum of 2
semesters extra coursework with a medium to heavy schedule each
semester, or 3 to 4 extra semesters if he took it easier. One of my
Korean classmates who started college as a freshman got a double
Master's degree in CE and Architecture 3 1/2 years later, which has to
be some kind of record (he knocked off about 60 hrs. worth of work by
proficiency exam as a freshman, which is the maximum they'd allow).
Needless to say, he didn't surface for air much during his college
years. And I thought I was doing well by getting my bachelors' and
masters' in CE in 5 years.

RP
Steve
2009-03-08 23:58:55 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Post by r***@ivnet.com
My dad might be a good one to ask, since he has a CE degree and was
about 1 credit hour short of having an EE degree when he graduated.
Well is there enough overlap between CE and EE that it
is possible to get BOTH at same time with little extra
coursework?
Not easy. EE is frequently grouped with computer programming, so
there are a lot of requirements that have nothing to do with CE. I do
know many EE's in our CE company, so if he wants to go that route (for
example, ITS systems) he should head for the EE degree and either
minor in CE or intern with a civil company.
m***@privacy.net
2009-03-09 00:26:21 UTC
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Post by Steve
Not easy. EE is frequently grouped with computer programming, so
there are a lot of requirements that have nothing to do with CE. I do
know many EE's in our CE company, so if he wants to go that route (for
example, ITS systems) he should head for the EE degree and either
minor in CE or intern with a civil company.
Well his interest is EE..... BUT he wants two work for
MODOT and not sure any EE jobs in mostly a civil
company
Steve
2009-03-09 01:40:29 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Not easy.  EE is frequently grouped with computer programming, so
there are a lot of requirements that have nothing to do with CE.  I do
know many EE's in our CE company, so if he wants to go that route (for
example, ITS systems) he should head for the EE degree and either
minor in CE or intern with a civil company.
Well his interest is EE..... BUT he wants two work for
MODOT and not sure any EE jobs in mostly a civil
company
EE in a civil company would probably put you in the private sector.
But I don't know what different state's practices are. NJDOT does
almost no design work in-house, whereas NYSDOT does a substantial
portion of their smaller projects without ever consulting a
contractor. So the more MoDOT does on their own, the more likelihood
they would have EE positions to help with the work.
r***@ivnet.com
2009-03-09 02:28:03 UTC
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Post by Steve
Post by m***@privacy.net
Not easy.  EE is frequently grouped with computer programming, so
there are a lot of requirements that have nothing to do with CE.  I do
know many EE's in our CE company, so if he wants to go that route (for
example, ITS systems) he should head for the EE degree and either
minor in CE or intern with a civil company.
Well his interest is EE..... BUT he wants two work for
MODOT and not sure any EE jobs in mostly a civil
company
EE in a civil company would probably put you in the private sector.
But I don't know what different state's practices are.  NJDOT does
almost no design work in-house, whereas NYSDOT does a substantial
portion of their smaller projects without ever consulting a
contractor.  So the more MoDOT does on their own, the more likelihood
they would have EE positions to help with the work.
There are a handful of EE's at IL DOT. They work on traffic signal,
lighting, ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) and pump station
design and installation. There may be a few EE's at the Capital
Development Board also (they manage building facilities for the state)
- one EE from CDB transferred to IL DOT several years ago to run the
utilities section in Springfield. But in-house design is on the
decline at most state highway departments, and an increasing amount of
work is given to consulting firms.

Most large engineering firms have several EE's on staff - working in
the aforementioned fields, plus electrified rail, rail signalling, and
energy sector (electric transmission, power generation, etc.)
projects.

One other comment on "double degree" CE/EE's...such a degree would
give a person a good breadth of training experience, but most
counselors would likely recommend being a specialist (i.e. Master's
degree) in either CE or EE with the time it would take to acquire a
double bachelor's CE/EE degree, if income is a primary concern.
Carefully chosen specialties often pay off better than broad "general"
degrees in a life career path.

RP
f***@gmail.com
2017-08-29 09:30:30 UTC
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Hello
I'm Fahad Ali. I want to ask does B.Tech in Civil have value in USA or in other countries ?
r***@gmail.com
2017-08-30 00:37:10 UTC
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I think most employers in the US wouldn't know what to think about a BTech, nor would most states' registration boards. Most engineering degrees are Bachelor of Science. Mine is Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Technology, and just that difference meant 1 or 2 years more experience before I could take the Professional Engineer exam or get reciprocity (depending on the state).
Floyd Rogers
2009-03-08 22:55:22 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Post by r***@ivnet.com
My dad might be a good one to ask, since he has a CE degree and was
about 1 credit hour short of having an EE degree when he graduated.
Well is there enough overlap between CE and EE that it
is possible to get BOTH at same time with little extra
coursework?
There is little overlap in the 3rd/4th year curriculum. I would not advise
it.
I have EE and CptS degrees - took one extra year - but there's a lot of
overlap; not so much for CE vs. EE.

FloydR
Arif Khokar
2009-03-09 01:59:29 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Well is there enough overlap between CE and EE that it
is possible to get BOTH at same time with little extra
coursework?
That may be the case with EE and CpE (computer engineering) if you're
just looking to get two degrees.
John A. Weeks III
2009-03-08 19:09:50 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
There are still civil engineering projects in the US, but
electrical engineering projects are increasingly done off-
shore. He may want to consider the outlook 20 and 30 years
down the line.

-john-
--
======================================================================
John A. Weeks III 612-720-2854 ***@johnweeks.com
Newave Communications http://www.johnweeks.com
======================================================================
r***@gmail.com
2009-03-08 20:26:43 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
I'm lacking on knowledge regarding opportunities for EE's, but for a
good, or almost any CE position, one needs a few years of experience
and a PE license - which also requires experience. Yet almost no one
offers any post-college positions to gain such experience. Then there
are employers like the Iowa DOT, where one pretty much needs a Masters
degree to get on.

Whatever field your son chooses, I recommend that he undertakes a co-
op position or two to get more experience before he graduates, and
somehow gain some of the overvalued leadership experience.
h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2009-03-08 20:55:12 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
The first year is mostly general courses that all students take, so a
decision is not needed right away.

In this case, salarly should NOT be a deciding factor; the fields are
roughly similar.

Note that both fields have many sub specialities.

Next summer the student should try for a job as a whatever "gopher" at
an engineering firm. This gives very valuable insights into the
field.
John Lansford
2009-03-08 22:33:42 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
Most engineering universities don't require a declaration for a
particular field of study until the student's junior year. Before
then all engineering students take the same classes, while taking some
basic courses that give them a taste of each of the different fields.
Another option is to see if he can get an intern job with a CE or EE
firm during the summer; that way he can see first hand what a CE/EE
does and decide if that's what he'd like to do.

John Lansford, PE
--
John's Shop of Wood
http://wood.jlansford.net/
h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2009-03-09 00:09:00 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
Son should be doing the research into the courses of study and work
occupations for both fields. The Federal Job Outlook book is a good
resource, but libraries have other resources for your son to research.

Also the college should have counseling services available.
Jason Pawloski
2009-03-09 01:26:05 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Soon to be son entering engineering school and
undecided abt which discipline to pursue
EE's make more money but CE's might have more jobs
available soon
Advice? Opinions?
If you'd like to have self-esteem, a girlfriend and/or wife, a
respectable job, a salary above the poverty line, and an aura of a man
who demands respect, you would choose EE, hands down. If you are a
retard you can choose Civil Engineering. Or you can be a real man and
do a real science.
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