Discussion:
Crossover interchanges (double diamonds and partial cloverleaves)
(too old to reply)
The Green Troll
2013-02-05 04:33:26 UTC
Permalink
In a diverging double crossover diamond interchange, what volume of
traffic creates a need for stoplights? Where there is a low volume of
cross traffic, it seems sufficient to require vehicles entering the
crossover to yield to those exiting the crossover, and those on the
ramps to yield to everyone. (On the other hand, if there is little
traffic on the ramps, why fork them?)

With hatched zebra crosswalks after the two yield signs on the cross
road, pedestrians would be able to walk diagonally across the
interchange, via the center median. With proximate signalized
intersections (or well-marked hatched zebra crosswalks) on either side
of the interchange, pedestrians could cross the road to reach the
other two corners. (If unhatched ordinary crosswalks are used for this
purpose, they leave no marking available for crosswalks designed only
to make sure the pedestrian crosses in the right place and does not
wander across a lane of moving traffic.)

Is there a design for a double crossover using two quadrants? It might
be used where a surface road rises to cross another surface road and
an adjacent non-roadway transportation corridor (railroad or canal),
with insufficient space between the lower road and the non-roadway.
Both roads would crossover. The ramps would have some resemblance to
cloverleaf ramps that merge together for most of their length, except
that they would be one-way, not two-way, and would thus lack the usual
double yellow line. One ramp would carry all upward traffic, the other
all downward traffic. If the lower roadway was reflected by another on
the far side of the bridge, the traffic could travel on the left for
the entire length of the bridge before crossing back. Restricting
heavy vehicles to the right lane crossing the bridge could minimize
torsion (as caused by subway trains passing on the sides of the
Williamsburgh Bridge instead of down the middle).

-- Buster <http://www.rev.net/~aloe/transportation>
The Green Troll
2013-02-25 07:11:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Green Troll
In a diverging double crossover diamond interchange, what volume of
traffic creates a need for stoplights?
Is there no way to figure this out?

-- Buster <http://www.rev.net/~aloe/transportation>
The Green Troll
2013-03-21 19:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Green Troll
Post by The Green Troll
In a diverging double crossover diamond interchange, what volume of
traffic creates a need for stoplights?
Is there no way to figure this out?
Perhaps this question is too difficult to find. We never had these
problems with Usenet back in the days of Deja News. We need it back,
ASAP.

-- Buster <http://www.rev.net/~aloe/transportation>
jgar the jorrible
2013-03-21 22:39:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Green Troll
Post by The Green Troll
Post by The Green Troll
In a diverging double crossover diamond interchange, what volume of
traffic creates a need for stoplights?
Is there no way to figure this out?
Perhaps this question is too difficult to find. We never had these
problems with Usenet back in the days of Deja News. We need it back,
ASAP.
-- Buster <http://www.rev.net/~aloe/transportation>
lol. The mass marketing of social media has ironically made it more
difficult to concentrate like-minded souls who ask and answer
interesting questions, even as nutcases can find each other and self-
reinforce their nuttiness. Wish I knew the answer to that. I've
debated people (in my obscure line of technical work) on twitter,
linkedin, fora etc. about the value of twitter, linkedin and so forth
for answering technical questions. I maintain the mediums make it hit-
or-miss unless a small group of motivated individuals take it upon
themselves to make it otherwise. Un- or low-moderated fora tend to go
downhill as gamification (points, badges, thumbs up/down) get
implemented, as people care more about popularity than veracity.
Mailing lists and other highly moderated fora tend to attract control-
freaks and wind up with cabals (that's certainly nothing new).

We have been cursed with living in interesting times. Let us know if
you find a place that gives answers, I've long thought these issues
ought to breed walled off communities (I see it in some technical
communities). Such communities often define themselves by who they
exclude, like any good clique.

Usenet is dead, film at 11. http://it.slashdot.org/story/00/02/04/2224201/is-usenet-dying

jg
--
@home.com is bogus.
http://www.gonctd.com/Sprinter_FAQ
p***@gmail.com
2019-11-17 22:12:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Green Troll
In a diverging double crossover diamond interchange, what volume of
traffic creates a need for stoplights? Where there is a low volume of
cross traffic, it seems sufficient to require vehicles entering the
crossover to yield to those exiting the crossover, and those on the
ramps to yield to everyone. (On the other hand, if there is little
traffic on the ramps, why fork them?)
With hatched zebra crosswalks after the two yield signs on the cross
road, pedestrians would be able to walk diagonally across the
interchange, via the center median. With proximate signalized
intersections (or well-marked hatched zebra crosswalks) on either side
of the interchange, pedestrians could cross the road to reach the
other two corners. (If unhatched ordinary crosswalks are used for this
purpose, they leave no marking available for crosswalks designed only
to make sure the pedestrian crosses in the right place and does not
wander across a lane of moving traffic.)
Is there a design for a double crossover using two quadrants? It might
be used where a surface road rises to cross another surface road and
an adjacent non-roadway transportation corridor (railroad or canal),
with insufficient space between the lower road and the non-roadway.
Both roads would crossover. The ramps would have some resemblance to
cloverleaf ramps that merge together for most of their length, except
that they would be one-way, not two-way, and would thus lack the usual
double yellow line. One ramp would carry all upward traffic, the other
all downward traffic. If the lower roadway was reflected by another on
the far side of the bridge, the traffic could travel on the left for
the entire length of the bridge before crossing back. Restricting
heavy vehicles to the right lane crossing the bridge could minimize
torsion (as caused by subway trains passing on the sides of the
Williamsburgh Bridge instead of down the middle).
-- Buster <http://www.rev.net/~aloe/transportation>
Can a 3-level cloverstack's cloverleaf loops have 2 lanes? All the ones I've seen only have 1 lane for the loops.
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