Discussion:
GPS Causing Truckers to Crash Into Bridges
(too old to reply)
Bridge Busters
2009-10-16 03:13:49 UTC
Permalink
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,566748,00.html?loomia_ow=t0:
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.

Gov. David Paterson on Wednesday proposed penalties including
jail time and confiscation of trucks to come down on drivers who
use GPS — global positioning systems — to take more hazardous
routes and end up striking bridges.

"To our knowledge, no other state has similar legislation," said
Clayton Boyce of the American Trucking Associations, an industry
trade group based in Washington.

"Most trucking companies rely on GPS services that are
specifically for trucks and route them away from restricted
roads," he said. "Most of our members also use dispatching and
fleet management systems that direct and track the vehicles by
truck GPS services."

In New York, a truckers' group called the proposal unfair and
unwarranted.

"We understand that bridge strikes have become an increasing
problem for Westchester County and the New York metropolitan
area," said Karin Kennett of the New York State Motor Truck
Association. Requiring all trucks in the state that are using
GPS to buy an enhanced device goes too far, she said.

"It places an unfair and unwarranted financial burden on every
law-abiding trucking company doing business anywhere in New York
at a time when our state claims to be trying to improve our
business climate," Kennett said.

A safety group said trucks taking restricted routes is a scary
fact of life on the nation's highways and parkways and something
other states will need to consider as more drivers turn to GPS.

Gerald Donaldson, senior research director of Advocates for
Highway and Auto Safety, said GPS adds to the list of
electronics that also distract truckers, including radios, cell
phones and a computer keyboard to communicate with companies and
other drivers.

"GPS is the heart of it," Donaldson said. "Absolutely ... other
states will be looking at Gov. Paterson's issue."

GPS can direct truckers, many of them carrying hazardous
material, to restricted roads with overpass clearances too low
for the rigs. Hauling on restricted or residential routes also
pounds the life out of roads because the trucks are over weight
limits and clog traffic.

"GPS for some truckers are crucial, and it also is part of a
much larger array of electronic devices," he said. "You get paid
by the mile, so it's your to your incentive to get as many miles
and routes as you can in your tour of duty."

New York state alone has seen more than 1,400 bridge strikes in
the past 15 years, including 46 so far this year in suburban
Westchester County, testing many old bridges already in need of
repair, said County Executive Andrew J. Spano. One bridge in his
county was hit nine times this year.

"This sort of culture of just following the GPS and almost
ignoring the road signs has created this public hazard,"
Paterson told reporters.

"Every week we hear of another truck striking a bridge on our
parkways," said Spano, standing with Paterson at the bill's
announcement.

"It's only a matter of time before someone is killed or a truck
carrying chemicals or explosives hits a bridge," he said.

The bill would increase penalties for illegally using parkways
and require all large commercial trucks to use GPS devices that
route them away from restricted roads. It would also stick
trucking companies or their insurance carriers with the bill for
repairs and cleanup after bridge strikes.

The bill could hit the Legislature as early as January.
Larry Sheldon
2009-10-16 03:32:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
Somebody should pass a law requiring trucks to have forward-facing
windows, and require that an alert human being be placed in the cab such
that they can keep a running commentary on what they see through those
windows with particular attention to square yellow signs standing on a
point--being able to explain in simple language what the words on the
signs say, or the pictures on the signs portray. Secondary attention
should be paid to rectangular yellow signs appearing near the top of the
windows.
used2be
2009-10-16 04:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Sheldon
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
Somebody should pass a law requiring trucks to have forward-facing
windows, and require that an alert human being be placed in the cab
such that they can keep a running commentary on what they see through
those windows with particular attention to square yellow signs
standing on a point--being able to explain in simple language what
the words on the signs say, or the pictures on the signs portray.
Secondary attention should be paid to rectangular yellow signs
appearing near the top of the windows.
lol!!!
Rocky
2009-10-16 04:38:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by used2be
lol!!!
"
Kurt Ullman
2009-10-16 11:27:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Sheldon
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. ‹ New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
Somebody should pass a law requiring trucks to have forward-facing
windows, and require that an alert human being be placed in the cab such
that they can keep a running commentary on what they see through those
windows with particular attention to square yellow signs standing on a
point--being able to explain in simple language what the words on the
signs say, or the pictures on the signs portray. Secondary attention
should be paid to rectangular yellow signs appearing near the top of the
windows.
That was more or less my first take. I don't see why they should
enhance the penalties only for those with GPS. Enhance it for everybody.
--
An old friend once said "You don't live on the edge,
you're taking up way too much space."
Scott Kirby "Lucky Enough"
H.B. Elkins
2009-10-16 13:00:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Sheldon
Somebody should pass a law requiring trucks to have forward-facing
windows, and require that an alert human being be placed in the cab such
that they can keep a running commentary on what they see through those
windows with particular attention to square yellow signs standing on a
point--being able to explain in simple language what the words on the
signs say, or the pictures on the signs portray. Secondary attention
should be paid to rectangular yellow signs appearing near the top of the
windows.
I've seen too many errors on maps and on GPS units and electronic mapping
services (online and software) to trust them 100 percent.

If my GPS is telling me to take a certain route but the sign says Dead End or
Bridge Out or Do Not Enter, I think I will pay more attention to the sign than
what the voice in my GPS is telling me. Don't these guys know what No Commercial
Vehicles or Low Clearance means?
--
To reply by e-mail, remove the "restrictor plate"
richard
2009-10-16 04:03:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
"The sky is falling!"
1400 strikes in 15 years. Wow. That's not even 8 per month.
Then you have one county that reports a huge number of strikes?
Are the signs posted properly? Are truckers made aware of that low bridge
before they are committed? Most likely not.

Then the state of NY goes around and posts clearance signs that are
precisely 12 inches lower than the actual clearance. So most drivers do not
know for a fact if they can clear that bridge until they try.

But then, there are those idiot drivers out there who will not think and go
ahead and try it anyway. GPS or not.

Who is to blame? In part, it is the state. They need to make a list of low
bridges more public and more complete.
Brent
2009-10-16 04:32:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by richard
"The sky is falling!"
1400 strikes in 15 years. Wow. That's not even 8 per month.
You know how costly a bridge strike can be? How much of a pain in the
ass they can be when roads have to be closed and bridges rebuilt?
Post by richard
Then you have one county that reports a huge number of strikes?
Are the signs posted properly? Are truckers made aware of that low bridge
before they are committed? Most likely not.
I've lived a number of places where some bridges were hit a lot. They
had lots of signage. Truckers still hit them. The slightly smarter ones
would stop just short and then have nowhere to go because they couldn't
turn around on a two lane road or city street.
Post by richard
Then the state of NY goes around and posts clearance signs that are
precisely 12 inches lower than the actual clearance. So most drivers do not
know for a fact if they can clear that bridge until they try.
So if they were measured exactly and then the street was resurfaced and
the sign wasn't updated ?

Also they wouldn't know the measurements on the sign were low unless
they tried right?
richard
2009-10-16 05:28:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brent
Post by richard
"The sky is falling!"
1400 strikes in 15 years. Wow. That's not even 8 per month.
You know how costly a bridge strike can be? How much of a pain in the
ass they can be when roads have to be closed and bridges rebuilt?
Post by richard
Then you have one county that reports a huge number of strikes?
Are the signs posted properly? Are truckers made aware of that low bridge
before they are committed? Most likely not.
I've lived a number of places where some bridges were hit a lot. They
had lots of signage. Truckers still hit them. The slightly smarter ones
would stop just short and then have nowhere to go because they couldn't
turn around on a two lane road or city street.
Post by richard
Then the state of NY goes around and posts clearance signs that are
precisely 12 inches lower than the actual clearance. So most drivers do not
know for a fact if they can clear that bridge until they try.
So if they were measured exactly and then the street was resurfaced and
the sign wasn't updated ?
Also they wouldn't know the measurements on the sign were low unless
they tried right?
my first experience with a NY bridge was when I had to go into, eeek!, NYC.
I entered through NJ and once on the interstate there I noted the signs
said 12'8". Huh? Not on an interstate. They have to be 13'6" by federal
law.


when the road is resurfaced and the sign is not updated, then that IS the
fault of the authority. They could possibly be held liable for damage to
that bridge because the sign was not updated.

Any driver who just blindly ignores common sense, should find another
career. You know how high you are, so why challenge the fixed object that
ain't gonna budge? Get out and look! You can't see the top of that trailer
from the driver's seat. If the trailer hits the bridge, it's your fault.
Period.
Brent
2009-10-16 12:22:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by richard
Any driver who just blindly ignores common sense, should find another
career. You know how high you are, so why challenge the fixed object that
ain't gonna budge?
The bridges do budge. 115th street bridge, chicago, over what is now
called the bishop ford expressway. trucker hit the support.
Post by richard
Get out and look! You can't see the top of that trailer
from the driver's seat.
Great... more traffic problems caused by truckers.
H.B. Elkins
2009-10-16 13:02:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by richard
But then, there are those idiot drivers out there who will not think and go
ahead and try it anyway. GPS or not.
Who is to blame? In part, it is the state. They need to make a list of low
bridges more public and more complete.
Implied in this story is the fact that these impacts are taking place on New
York's parkway system, which bans commercial vehicles anyway. All the signs I
have seen for those parkways make it very plain that they are not for commercial
vehicles. Whose fault is it that the driver can't read or heed those signs?
--
To reply by e-mail, remove the "restrictor plate"
Larry Sheldon
2009-10-16 15:37:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by H.B. Elkins
Post by richard
But then, there are those idiot drivers out there who will not think and go
ahead and try it anyway. GPS or not.
Who is to blame? In part, it is the state. They need to make a list of low
bridges more public and more complete.
Implied in this story is the fact that these impacts are taking place on New
York's parkway system, which bans commercial vehicles anyway. All the signs I
have seen for those parkways make it very plain that they are not for commercial
vehicles. Whose fault is it that the driver can't read or heed those signs?
Somewhere in my training I got it hammered into my head that in NY it is
"parkways--NEVER, express-ways--ever".

I've always thought it was comforting to curl up with my MCA, and the
info I got from the dispatcher (and occasionally, the shipper) and work
out in my little note-pad thingy the route steps (old notes in the pad
thingy to that place or one nearby was sometimes helpful.

I[number]15 to [state] exit [number][directional]
US [number] directional] [number] miles to [town].

And so forth from where I was sitting to where I would find out what
dock I was to back into.

If I was missing details, or the stuff from the dispatcher didn't make
sense on the map, time to call consignee and get it straight.
--
Requiescas in pace o email Two identifying characteristics
of System Administrators:
Ex turpi causa non oritur actio Infallibility, and the ability to
learn from their mistakes.
Eppure si rinfresca

ICBM Targeting Information:
http://tinyurl.com/4sqczs
http://tinyurl.com/7tp8ml
pbj
2009-10-16 04:13:37 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 Oct 2009 05:13:49 +0200, Bridge Busters wrote:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,566748,00.html?loomia_ow=t0:
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
New York state alone has seen more than 1,400 bridge strikes in the past
15 years, including 46 so far this year in suburban Westchester County,
testing many old bridges already in need of repair, said County
Executive Andrew J. Spano. One bridge in his county was hit nine times
this year.
Maybe the drivers would have been more alert if they'd been able to
sleep more comfortably?
r***@gmail.com
2009-10-16 06:01:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
New York state alone has seen more than 1,400 bridge strikes in the past
15 years, including 46 so far this year in suburban Westchester County,
testing many old bridges already in need of repair, said County
Executive Andrew J. Spano. One bridge in his county was hit nine times
this year.
Maybe the drivers would have been more alert if they'd been able to
sleep more comfortably?
Firstly, you have to understand Richard is a complete idiot as well
as a bumbling fool

and I am being so very polite, you have no idea


ow quoted text -
Post by Bridge Busters
"The sky is falling!"
1400 strikes in 15 years. Wow. That's not even 8 per month.
You know how costly a bridge strike can be? How much of a pain in the
ass they can be when roads have to be closed and bridges rebuilt?
Then you have one county that reports a huge number of strikes?
Are the signs posted properly? Are truckers made aware of that low bridge
before they are committed? Most likely not.
I've lived a number of places where some bridges were hit a lot. They
had lots of signage. Truckers still hit them. The slightly smarter ones
would stop just short and then have nowhere to go because they couldn't
turn around on a two lane road or city street.
Then the state of NY goes around and posts clearance signs that are
precisely 12 inches lower than the actual clearance. So most drivers do not
know for a fact if they can clear that bridge until they try.
So if they were measured exactly and then the street was resurfaced and
the sign wasn't updated ?
Also they wouldn't know the measurements on the sign were low unless
they tried right?
my first experience with a NY bridge was when I had to go into, eeek!,
NYC.
I entered through NJ and once on the interstate there I noted the
signs
said 12'8". Huh? Not on an interstate. They have to be 13'6" by
federal
law.

this is your first indication how extremely stupid Richard is

what is the extreme idiot's suggestion? that an interstate with
bridges that are not 13 ft 6 in be immediately resigned as a state
hwy?

or perhaps just closed entirely

please tell me?

my feeling would be that any trucking company that would permit
extreme idiot Richard to drive any of its trucks into NYC or any of
its environs should lose its permits and operating authority
immediately if not sooner

something else to consider about extreme idiot Richard

was he the first truck ever to encounter a low clearance on this
route?

furthermore, it must have been an extremely inept company with
horribly stupid mgmt to have no one with any experience on this route
bbelly
2009-10-16 12:34:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@gmail.com
Firstly, you have to understand Richard is a complete idiot as well
as a bumbling fool
Richard IS NOT a complete idiot.

He and the diaper boy are work in progress
Larry Sheldon
2009-10-16 15:24:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
New York state alone has seen more than 1,400 bridge strikes in the past
15 years, including 46 so far this year in suburban Westchester County,
testing many old bridges already in need of repair, said County
Executive Andrew J. Spano. One bridge in his county was hit nine times
this year.
Maybe the drivers would have been more alert if they'd been able to
sleep more comfortably?
Good point.
--
Requiescas in pace o email Two identifying characteristics
of System Administrators:
Ex turpi causa non oritur actio Infallibility, and the ability to
learn from their mistakes.
Eppure si rinfresca

ICBM Targeting Information:
http://tinyurl.com/4sqczs
http://tinyurl.com/7tp8ml
richard
2009-10-16 07:11:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
http://www.aitaonline.com/Info/Low%20Clearances.html#Illinois%20Low%20Clearances

This site has a huge list of low bridges on Interstates, US routes and
state highways. But like most lists, fails to cover other streets or inside
large cities.
A Teamster
2009-10-16 11:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y.  —  New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
http://www.aitaonline.com/Info/Low%20Clearances.html#Illinois%20Low%2...
This site has a huge list of low bridges on Interstates, US routes and
state highways. But like most lists, fails to cover other streets or inside
large cities.
The listings for Michigan are incorrect. I know for a fact that the
two listed on Woodward Ave. in Highland Park are above 13' 6".
PeterD
2009-10-16 14:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridge Busters
s0:a16:g4:r4:c0.000000:b28330382:z10
ALBANY, N.Y. — New York state wants to crack down on truckers
who rely on satellite devices to direct them onto faster but
prohibited routes and end up crashing into overpasses that are
too low for their rigs.
...
What a joke, more politicians trying to think of more justification
for their continued existance. All the roadways that are subject to
this are posted, with sufficient notification that truckers (who know
anyway) that they are not allowed, and as well there are already
sufficient laws and regulations covering the subject, for exactly this
reason.

Idiots...
Scott in SoCal
2009-10-16 14:18:49 UTC
Permalink
There - fixed your subject line for you.
Loading...